Coaching Corner

I have been a National Coach for over 15 years. I received my Level 3 coaching certificate from the NAA when they were conducting training at Arizona State University in Tempe AZ. My professors, Dr.’s Hans van der Mars, Phil Martin, Dan and Donna Landers, were joined by Sheri Rhodes, Dick and Diane Tone, Jay Barrs and Nancy Myrick, to make Level 3 an unforgettable experience for all of us attending. To this day, I am still in contact with the overseas coaches from Italy, Greece, and New Zealand. They gave the program an international flair. I still recall sitting in the hotel lobby area with the other hopeful coaches and studying for our professors’ final exams the next day. Taking Level 3 was very difficult then. Unlike today’s certification program, to be awarded Level 3, you had to pass a final exam prepared by each professor in every subject. Should you fail even one, you were out!

The Level 4 National Coach Course was very similar to the Level 3 course. Many of the same professors were present at the OTC in Colorado Springs. Unlike today’s admittance standards, Level 4 required you to be active in coaching before your application to attend was approved. Also, your National Coach project was chosen for you by Nancy Myrick and given to you shortly after you arrived. Your project was to be researched, written, and ready for presentation to your professors and peers on the day before your final exams (yes, you still had a final exam).

I was given the task of developing an outline for Coach’s Ethics and Conduct – something we desperately need today. At this time I was introduced to a visiting foreign Olympic Coach who was in the process of developing and marketing a remarkable recurve bow line called Win & Win.

A while back, as fate would have it, I was honored that W&W founder, Mr. Kyung Rae Park, when he chose my prior location, ArcheryUSA, to host the first W&W Advanced Coach Certification Seminar in the U.S. His course was designed to teach the “Korean Method” of coaching to NAA Level 3 and 4 instructors.

To be open, my pet-peeve, and the reason for this page, is that whenever I speak with newly-certified coaches, I get the impression that many of them have been taught the principles of coaching (book smart) but do not know how to actually coach an athlete. Not to mention, almost none know how to develop a training plan, or how to interact on a personal level with their athletes. This, my friends, is a sad state of affairs for archers and coaches alike.

I am constantly asked for my opinion on coaching issues. Those who know me well know that I do not care about “political correctness” and I am indeed opinionated on some issues… I will always be frank! So don’t hold back… ask away!

E-mail me any question on any aspect of coaching and I’ll try to help.

At my discretion, I may post your question with my reply on the BayState Archery site. Please inform me if you do not wish to have your question posted for general reading, or you simply wish to remain anonymous.

My e-mail address is baystatearchery (at) ymail.com. Please include your name, address and contact information in the body of your email. Also, please indicate “Coach Question” in the subject box, or it may be deleted as spam.

Thank YOU!

Anthony Bellettini